Jennifer Brennan-Hondorp

Kishna Davis

Pamela Hinchman

Pamela Hinchman

Teresa Seidl

Shawnette Sulker

Stella Zambalis

Buffy Baggott

Misty Bermudez

Julia Elise Hardin

Jennifer Lane

Carol Sparrow

Michelle Wrighte

Robert Bracey

Benjamin Brecher

James Doing

Randolph Locke

Jeffrey Springer

Mark Thomsen

Bradley Williams

Graham Fandrei

Kenneth Overton

Frederick Reeder

Charles Robert Stephens

Gerard Sundberg

James Patterson

Additional Artists

THE BEST OF GILBERT AND SULLIVAN

A GERSHWIN GALA

Concert Quartets

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Robert Bracey, tenor

Robert Bracey, tenor

Reviews

 

Bach:  St. John Passion                    

Toledo Symphony Orchestra, Toledo, OH                              

The grandest and most dramatic voice of the evening belonged to tenor Robert Bracey . . .Bracey sang with authority. The effect of his opening aria, an anguished soliloquy from the apostle Peter after denying Jesus the third time, was chilling, even brutal, as he condemned the “wrong-doing evil deed abhorred.”

            -The Toledo Blade

 

Bach: St. Matthew Passion               

Toledo Symphony Orchestra, Toledo, OH                  

The soloists were well chosen. Robert Bracey’s bright, focused tenor arias . . . were impressive.

            -The Toledo Blade

 

Bach Festival of Winter Park, Winter Park, FL

The soloists were admirable for their exceptional musicality. Robert Bracey sang the tenor arias with a more powerful, but controlled sound.

            -Orlando Sentinel

 

Beethoven: Missa Solemnis

Choral Society of Durham, Durham, NC

Chorus, soloists, and orchestra: all were at home with Beethoven’s music, all were emotionally engaged, and all collaborated flawlessly under Wynkoop’s baton as they jointly breathed life into this incredible work of art. Surely Beethoven would have been pleased with the results. Soloists Tamara Matthews, soprano, Heather Johnson, mezzo-soprano, Robert Bracey, tenor, and Stephen Morscheck, bass, were uniformly outstanding throughout. Gorgeous voices, technical brilliance, and a solid understanding of the style marked their performances. All in all, it doesn’t get much better than this: grand art elegantly performed in a grand space.

            -Classical Voice North Carolina

 

Beethoven: Symphony no. 9             

Elgin Symphony, Elgin, IL

The finale featured pristine performances by soprano Jonita Lattimore, mezzo-soprano Emily Lodine, tenor Robert Bracey and bass Stephen Morscheck and the ECU. The reverential benediction late in the movement led to a dizzying climax that was nothing short of brilliant.

            - The Daily Herald (Suburban Chicago)

           

Flint Symphony, Flint, MI

Adding to the list of impressive ingredients in the Beethoven was the stellar singing by a quartet of solo vocalists. As a prelude to the Beethoven, the vocal soloists were featured during the first part of the concert in several pieces from popular operas and operettas.  Bracey sensitively sang a lyrical solo from Verdi’s “La Traviata.”

            -The Flint Journal

 

Duluth Superior Symphony, Duluth, MN

All four soloists were able to fill the auditorium with power and inspiration. The lightness of Bracey's solo, a "Turkish march," injected a little humor into the symphony.

            -The Duluth News Tribune

 

Pacific Symphony, Orange County, CA

The vocal quartet was solid...Bracey gave the most gripping solo, with a hop in his step.

            -The Orange County Register

           

Pacific Symphony, Orange County, CA

Conductor Carl St. Clair had the tools for the job, from the big-boned cello recitatives at the beginning to the stentorian quartet of vocal soloists...

            -Orange County Edition, The Los Angeles Times

 

Ann Arbor Symphony, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tenor Bracey rang out the message of the brotherhood of humankind in clarion tones.

            -The Ann Arbor News

 

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

…Four very talented and well-matched soloists

            -The Well Tempered Ear

 

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

Bracey joined bass Timothy Jones, mezzo Jamie Van Eyck and soprano Michelle Areyzaga for the solo work in the final movement, all of whom sang with confidence and clarity.

            -77 Square Madison.com (Wisconsin State Journal and The Capital Times)

 

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

Each member of the solo vocal quartet handled their responsibilities without a hint of undue labor: tenor Robert Bracey delivered jaunty singing in the “Turkish” episode… with the foursome wonderfully full and balanced in their final extended sequence.

            -Madison Magazine

 

Berlioz: Messe Solennelle                

North Carolina Symphony, Raleigh, NC

No apologies for tenor Robert Bracey's finely focused, expertly controlled contribution to the "Agnus Dei," the one truly exhilarating portion of the performance.

            -The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC)

           

North Carolina Symphony, Raleigh, NC

As in the Requiem, the tenor soloist has only one moment in the sun; Bracey made the most of it, and his was the performance's strongest single vocal contribution.

            -Classical Voice North Carolina

 

Britten: Canticle III: Still Falls the Rain

UNCG School of Music, Theatre and Dance, Greensboro, NC

Tenor Robert Bracey seemed born for this music, with a beautiful bright clear tone, an aristocratic bearing (in the best sense), and a pristine delivery of the difficult and evocative text. Pianist Rebecca Wilt and hornist Abigail Pack were on a similarly high level. This was some of the best singing I have heard in quite some time. In a word: perfection.

            -Classical Voice North Carolina

 

Britten: The Heart of the Matter

             (Canticle III: Still Falls the Rain)

20th Fontana Festival of Music and Art, Shelbyville, MI         

Bracey impressed with a crystalline pure tenor voice, which, smooth as honey at pianissimo, could swiftly billow into astonishing double forte. His timbre resembled that of Peter Pears, while articulation and interpretation were exemplary.

            -The Kalamazoo Gazette

 

Finzi: Dies Natalis (excerpt)               

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

One of the evening's highlights was tenor Robert Bracey's performance of the last two movements of Gerald Finzi's "Dies Natalis." Bracey's tenor was superb, floating lightly and fully above the orchestra during the two movements.

            -The Capital Times

 

FInzi: Dies Natalis (complete)

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

Tenor Robert Bracey, associate professor of voice at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, joined the orchestra in the Capitol Theater for Gerald Finzi's "Dies Natalis" (1940).

"How fair and bright! How great am I/ Whom the whole world doth magnify!" Bracey sang in the "Rapture" movement. Bracey had a dark, rich tone, a fine match with impassioned trills in the high strings and rhythmic pizzicato (plucked strings) in the bass and cello. I loved Bracey's phrasing, and how his long held notes seemed to whisper away.

            -77 Square Madison.com (Wisconsin State Journal and The Capital Times)

 

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

Finzi writes haunting and poignant string parts; and the solo tenor part was delivered with immediacy and emotion, as well as great tone, by the tenor Robert Bracey.

            -The Well Tempered Ear

 

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

Tenor Robert Bracey…his handsome vocal sound.

            -Isthmus The Daily Page

 

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

Conductor Sewell answered the question of what to program with the Beethoven Ninth as only he could — with something few in the audience had likely ever heard, yet cries out for performance. The Dies Natalis (“Day of Birth”) of Gerald Finzi, for strings and tenor, is a sublime marriage of music and text; its five movements span twenty-five memorable minutes, and Bracey here had every opportunity to display his unforced and nuanced voice.

            -Madison Magazine

 

Handel: Messiah                                

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

Happily we were treated to a quartet that seemed of one mind, stylistically speaking: they were careful to navigate the fleet passages with care…Tenor Robert Bracey was the first to exhibit this with flowing execution of “Ev’ry Valley Shall Be Exalted.”

Other highlights, solo and collective, all arrived near the end. Bracey delivered the most aggressive singing of the night in “Thou Shalt Break Them,” leading into the “Hallelujah” chorus — which was anything but anti-climactic.

            -Dane101.com

 

University Musical Society, Ann Arbor, MI

Bracey's refined tenor voice was delivered with an unshakable presence.

            -Ann Arbor.com

 

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

All of the soloists have sung with the chamber orchestra before, and all have the techniques and voices that fit Handel's music beautifully. Tenor Robert Bracey immediately set a high standard with the opening recitative, "Comfort Ye, My People," and aria, "Ev'ry Valley Shall Be Exalted," with a warm and vibrant voice, and an interpretation that included nicely balanced ornamentation.

            -The Wisconsin State Journal

 

Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, Madison, WI

Fortunately, Bracey was on hand as one of four soloists for WCO's 25th annual "Sing-Out Messiah,”...Bracey's glowing tenor was put in its proper context next to (Emily) Lodine's rich, buttery alto...

            -The Capital Times

 

Duke University Chapel Choir and Orchestra, Durham, NC

This year's Messiah featured fine soloists of considerable parity in vocal quality. All had very firm voices, and all were outstanding in projecting their texts, which were clearly enunciated. Truly clarion tenors in area oratorio performances have been rare here, so every sound that rang from tenor Robert Bracey was a joy; I was purring (silently) from the first "Comfort ye my people."  One of the great pleasures of this performance was in savoring the discrete ornaments with which all the soloists embroidered their repeated lines.

            -Classical Voice North Carolina

 

Duke University Chapel Choir and Orchestra, Durham, NC

Soloists Kendra Colton, soprano, Robert Bracey, tenor, Mark Crayton, countertenor, and Stephen Morscheck, bass-baritone, were able musicians of high technical skill and full understanding of the music and texts they sang. Bracey had the dubious pleasure of beginning the evening's vocal fireworks with that well-known tenor trap, "Ev'ry Valley Shall be Exalted," which he handled with great skill. None of his other arias were lightweights, either, but he vanquished all difficulties.

            -Classical Voice North Carolina

 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Detroit, MI                                 

Four excellent soloists distinguished themselves. Bracey, opened “Every Valley Shall Be Exalted” with a voice as lyrical as it was powerful.

            -The Grand Rapids Press

           

Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, Charlotte, NC            

Robert Bracey’s tenor solos were delivered with grace and an even, ringing tone.

            -The Charlotte Observer

 

Independence Messiah Festival, Independence, MO

The soloists were all superb, with Robert Bracey bringing a bracing, masculine strength to the tenor solos.

            -The Kansas City Star

 

Calvin College Oratorio Society, Grand Rapids, MI                

Robert Bracey’s tenor was perfect for the opening aria . . . Bracey’s diction and dynamic control were excellent.

            -The Grand Rapids Press

           

Calvin College Oratorio Society, Grand Rapids, MI

Bracey was a master of the swelled tone from soft to loud and soft again. With sparkling arias such as “Every Valley,” every 16th note in the long phrases was crystal clear. Yet with the stern aria “Thou Shalt Break Them,” he coated his sweet voice with a sheath of steal up through some impressive high notes.

            -The Grand Rapids Press

 

Handel: Semele                                             

Detroit Oratorio Society, Detroit, MI                                        

Bracey gave his phrases a long and noble arch, and invested a touching humanity into the inhuman Jupiter.

            -The Detroit News

 

Haydn: Creation                                 

North Carolina Symphony, Raleigh, NC

Bracey, as the angel Uriel, had admirable control in his felicitous solo "In native worth."

            -The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC)

           

Saginaw Choral Society, Saginaw, MI                                               

Bravos go to the three superb soloists who sung with clarity as well.

            -The Saginaw News

 

Mendelssohn: Die Erste Walpurgisnacht

Choral Society of Greensboro, Greensboro, NC

Robert Bracey’s singing was magnificent – heralding the change of the seasons with operatic high notes that were glorious and easily rose above both chorus and orchestra. The chorus matched Bracey’s intensity with animated and energetic singing.

            -The News and Record (Greensboro, NC)

 

Mendelssohn: Elijah                                      

Bach Festival Society of Winter Park, Winter Park, FL

Tenor Robert Bracey's voice soared as he sang the part of Obadiah in the work. His remarkable voice added a refreshing brightness to the overall dark color of the work. What qualities the four soloists possess alone were only magnified and strengthened when they sang together. It truly showcased the immense talent of the four singers as they blended beautifully, while still maintaining their own individual charms.

            -The Sandspur (Florida’s oldest college newspaper)

 

Grand Rapids Symphony, Grand Rapids, MI

Tenor Robert Bracey sang sweetly, but never weakly, as Obadiah on such arias as “If with all your hearts,” Bracey’s oratorio work is ideal, with nuanced recitatives followed by arias sung in a beautiful, lyrical voice.

            -The Grand Rapids Press

 

Saginaw Choral Society, Saginaw, MI                                               

Tenor Robert Bracey from his first recitative in the opening moments was a voice one always anticipated hearing, beautifully clear and precise and strong as he sang.

            -The Saginaw News

 

Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH              

Bracey possesses a crystal clear tenor with a clarion quality that makes for wonderfully effective oratorio singing.

            -The Toledo Blade

 

Mendelssohn: Lobgesang                             

Wichita Symphony, Wichita, KS

The vocal soloists were wonderful. Tenor Robert Bracey sang with a fine sound and an easy delivery.

            -The Wichita Eagle

 

Mozart: Requiem                                

Grand Rapids Symphony, Grand Rapids, MI

(The quartet) blended beautifully throughout. Bracey’s tenor cried out like a clarion in the Tuba mirum.

            -The Grand Rapids Press

 

Kalamazoo Bach Festival, Kalamazoo, MI

All the soloists possess stunning voices . . . In the “Tuba mirum” the very agitated tenor solo was perfectly framed by Bracey’s incisive voice. In the “Recordare” and “Benedictus,”  the singing from the soloists was perfectly balanced.

            -The Kalamazoo Gazette

 

University of North Carolina Greensboro Orchestra and Chorale, Greensboro, NC

Tenor Robert Bracey’s voice had a wonderfully clarion ring during his portion of "Tuba mirum." It was stirring. A highlight of this section was the beautiful blend of Bracey's voice with the solo trombone during "In quo totum continetur" within the "Tuba mirum" section. The four soloists made an unusually well-balanced and satisfactory group in their ensemble portions such as the "Benedictus.” Balances among the vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra were excellent.

            -Classical Voice North Carolina

 

Greensboro Symphony Orchestra, Greensboro, NC

All four soloists were impressive. Bracey’s robust and clear singing was strong and easy to hear.

            -Classical Voice North Carolina

 

Choral Society of Durham and Duke University Chapel Choir, Durham, NC

The Recordare was a wonderful rendition of the gentile prayer “Remember, merciful Jesus,” by the quartet of soloists, including the velvety alto Mary Gayle Greene, and the impressive tenor, Robert Bracey, Coordinator of Vocal Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

            -Classical Voice North Carolina

 

Mozart: Mass in C minor                   

Choral Arts Society of Washington, Washington, DC

...the superb soloists...combined with chorus and orchestra in a blazing performance of Mozart's Mass.

            -The Washington Post

 

Orff: Carmina Burana             

Elgin Symphony, Elgin, IL

Bracey’s wonderful, sturdy voice kept the comically macabre “olim lacus colueram” from falling too far into parody.

            -The Elgin Daily Herald

           

Greater Lansing Symphony Orchestra, Lansing, MI                

Bracey sang the notorious “swan song.” Bracey was astonishing as he sang notes higher than a tenor should be allowed to sing. Although climbing into the highest range, his voice was even and musical.

            -The Lansing State Journal    

 

Opera Gala Opening Concert

Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra, Ann Arbor, MI

… the extraordinary voices - especially Bracey’s tenor-idol talent . . . In voice, gesture and gaze the singers transported themselves and their audience far from the Michigan Theater. Bracey and (soprano) Neilsen teamed up for an engaging “O soave fanciulla” from Puccini’s “Boheme.” . . .(There was) much good musicianship: the beautiful musical arc to the Puccini, the ring and timing of Bracey’s last notes in “La Donna e mobile.”  

            -The Ann Arbor News

 

Schubert: Mass in E-flat                    

North Carolina Symphony, Raleigh, NC

The unusual combination of soloists in the Credo (soprano Heather Buck, tenor Robert Bracey and tenor Carl Halvorson) floated a gorgeous blend…

            -The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC)

 

Verdi:  Requiem                     

Wichita Symphony, Wichita KS

The evening's soloists -- alto Emily Lodine, tenor Robert Bracey and bass Craig Hart -- were superb, bringing the human dimension to the work...

            -The Wichita Eagle

 

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