Jennifer Brennan-Hondorp

Kishna Davis

Pamela Hinchman

Pamela Hinchman

Teresa Seidl

Shawnette Sulker

Stella Zambalis

Buffy Baggott

Julia Elise Hardin

Jennifer Lane

Carol Sparrow

Michelle Wrighte

Robert Bracey

Benjamin Brecher

James Doing

Randolph Locke

Jeffrey Springer

Mark Thomsen

Bradley Williams

Graham Fandrei

Kenneth Overton

Frederick Reeder

Charles Robert Stephens

Gerard Sundberg

James Patterson

Additional Artists

THE BEST OF GILBERT AND SULLIVAN

A GERSHWIN GALA

Concert Quartets

Click on thumb to enlarge picture

Randolph Locke, tenor

As Radames in AIDA
"Randolph Locke, an Opera Columbus regular, delivered one of his most-compelling performances as Radames. Celste Aida is a challenge, because its slow tempo, high range and soft dynamics combine to test a singer's sense of line. Locke proved better than most in his sincere and unflawed performance of this memorable aria.”
Barbara Zuck, Columbus DISPATCH

Randolph Locke started out with a surprisingly intimate "Celeste Aida," with careful attention to the text, even ending pianissimo as Verdi wanted. Continuing with welcome textural and musical detail, enlivened by blazing high notes, Locke was heroically spirited in voice and demeanor.
Charles H. Parsons, OPERA NEWS ONLINE

As Samson in SAMSON ET DALILA
"The performers put careful singing at the forefront, delivering clear-voiced performances that blended well. . . Locke and Bybee have their strongest moment in the famous second act seduction duet. As her aria "Mon coeur s'ouvre ta voix" enters the second verse, Locke erupts with heartfelt passion and anguish. . . Locke, seen previously in CORPS OF DISCOVERY and TALES OF HOFFMANN, is most solid with his part. From proud freedom fighter to a blinded fool, Locke's character is always robust and fun to watch. . . The final scene when Samson brings down the house, provides exciting closure to an evening of solidly performed music
Christopher Blank, Memphis COMMERCIAL APPEAL

Tenor Randolph Locke, regularly referred to as "a Memphis favorite," was a definite audience-pleaser with his strong voice and equally strong acting in the role of Samson. Nobody, but nobody, can convey anguish, pain, agony, and distress on the opera stage better than Locke. He twists, staggers, writhes, grimaces, walks, and moves with such wracked misery; it is difficult not to feel some discomfort merely watching him. He obviously enjoyed portraying the blinded and bound Samson. . . At the Tuesday performance, Samson brought the walls down, but brought the audience up. . . onto its feet for another standing O for Opera Memphis.
Jim Eikner, Guest critic from WKNO

As Calaf in TURANDOT
Randolph Locke, as Calàf sang with a voice full of passion and power, yet it could be sensitive and sensible in quiet passages. In Act II, he followed a laser-beam explosion of triumph with a perfectly delicate, nuanced "Dimmi il nome." Locke sang "Nessun dorma" as written, beginning very softly, steadily building to an applause-evoking climax.
Charles Parsons, OPERA NEWS ONLINE, 2/20/09

Graham (Turandot) was complemented by a fiery and impetuous Calaf, her successful suitor, as smartly performed by the swagger-happy Randolph Locke. Although he never sank to over broad gestures as Calaf,...he delivered an emotionally rich and forthright "Nessun dorma."
Edward Ortiz, SACRAMENTO BEE

Soprano Lori Phillips and tenor Randolph Locke reprise their 2001appearance as Princess Turandot and Calaf, the prince who's more than a match for Turandot's will. Their voices sparkle throughout. . . Her voice commands attention for its beauty, variety, and power. Locke is similarly sharp in his renderings. His interpretation of "Nessun dorma" (None will sleep) . . . stirs the heart with its musical eloquence.
Evans Donnell, NASHVILLE TENNEESEAN

Lori Phillips and Randolph Locke made hugely successful Indianapolis debuts as Princess Turandot and the bold, mysterious foreign prince who escapes beheading by answering all three questions to her. . . In Act 3, Locke began softly and mysteriously building to a rafter-shaking climax in “Nessun dorma. . .” no one would sleep until she learned the prince’s identity.
Whitney Smith, INDIANAPOLIS STAR

As Canio in I PAGLIACCI
Tenor Randolph Locke as the anguished clown, Canio, and bass-baritone Lester Lynch as the lustful player/servant, Tonio, filled the space with their expressive voices, portraying outsized emotions effortlessly. The great aria, or course, is Canio’s “Vesti la giubba” (put on the costume), which Locke sings masterfully to bring down the first act curtain.
Mae G. Banner, THE SARATOGIAN

Pulling double duty, Locke also played Canio and that character’s moment, the famous aria Vesti la guibba, was glorious indeed, a conflicted heart wrenching performance that was its own catharsis.
Bill Ellis, Memphis COMMERCIAL APPEAL

As Turiddu in CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA
As Turiddu, tenor Randolph Locke . . . embraced one of his best roles yet. The commending singer also makes a fine actor and threw himself into the part, exuding great vocal and acting range, all summed up in the aria, Mamma, quell vino e generoso, his sobering farewell to his mother Lucia.
Bill Ellis, Memphis COMMERICIAL APPEAL

As Erik in DIE FLIEGENDER HOLLANDER
Randolph Locke’s robust tenor provided huntsman Erik with some much-needed backbone; his dream aria of Act 2 and his anguish over losing Senta in Act 3 were particularly memorable.
Ruth O. Bingham, THE HONOLULU OBSERVER

Seidel Artists Management. Copyright © VoxPage1.com. All Rights Reserved